{14 notes}
loveisthicker:

The commodification of art turns artists into corporations with little to no awareness of the power of love, the gift of being a vessel, of producing culture. When what you love protects you and what you protect loves you. To be more than slogan or spectacle or tool, how to honor the gifts we all have and not diminish the light it gives by exploiting the glow it inspires. I want to see a shifting. I want to see the old ways not working anymore that we may treat each other better and demand more beauty, more love. To nurture creativity and not enslave it. If we can imagine it, it is possible. Decolonize your imagination.

loveisthicker:

The commodification of art turns artists into corporations with little to no awareness of the power of love, the gift of being a vessel, of producing culture. When what you love protects you and what you protect loves you. To be more than slogan or spectacle or tool, how to honor the gifts we all have and not diminish the light it gives by exploiting the glow it inspires. I want to see a shifting. I want to see the old ways not working anymore that we may treat each other better and demand more beauty, more love. To nurture creativity and not enslave it. If we can imagine it, it is possible. Decolonize your imagination.

{150 notes}
putthison:

Shorts: Acceptable When Paired with Mild Reluctance
Several otherwise respectable writers and publications have dipped their toes into menswear blogging recently, spurred by an ongoing debate on the propriety of shorts (aka “short pants”). In The New York Times, Jake Flanigin traces the argument to a 2011 interview in which Tom Ford assailed shorts and flip flops. Many would insist that certain climates demand shorts, but reasonable people disagree, including Andrew Exum, who made the flowchart above. (We’ve weighed in before, too.)
I own and wear shorts. Not to work. Not to anything that could be called an occasion. I am aware that I look better in other, longer leg coverings, because I’m an adult man and our legs look like they belong to a primate ancestor. But we make compromises for culture and comfort, and refusing to wear shorts on principle is the sort of rulebound thinking that makes people roll their eyes at rules. So: wear shorts. Fortunately, it’s September, and we can hide our hairy Neanderlegs comfortably until next June.
-Pete

putthison:

Shorts: Acceptable When Paired with Mild Reluctance

Several otherwise respectable writers and publications have dipped their toes into menswear blogging recently, spurred by an ongoing debate on the propriety of shorts (aka “short pants”). In The New York Times, Jake Flanigin traces the argument to a 2011 interview in which Tom Ford assailed shorts and flip flops. Many would insist that certain climates demand shorts, but reasonable people disagree, including Andrew Exum, who made the flowchart above. (We’ve weighed in before, too.)

I own and wear shorts. Not to work. Not to anything that could be called an occasion. I am aware that I look better in other, longer leg coverings, because I’m an adult man and our legs look like they belong to a primate ancestor. But we make compromises for culture and comfort, and refusing to wear shorts on principle is the sort of rulebound thinking that makes people roll their eyes at rules. So: wear shorts. Fortunately, it’s September, and we can hide our hairy Neanderlegs comfortably until next June.

-Pete